Samuel Leach is a UK-based self-taught stock trader, entrepreneur, and CEO. After building an impressively successful portfolio at an early age, Leach leveraged his experiences, along with his desire to help others, into the creation of his stock market education company, Samuel & Co. Trading. Growing in scope since its 2012 inception, Leach’s Samuel & Co. Trading has helped over 3,000 fledgling traders from over 63 countries successfully enter the field of stock market trading. His unique teaching methodology, focus on the implementation of intuitive algorithms within all endeavors, and commitment to risk-benefit analysis has made Leach’s programs wildly successful.

While Leach focuses on the global growth of his company, the avid trader also continues to build his personal investment portfolio though extensive trading. Pivoting his focus to include mostly stable blue-chip stocks, and FX trades, Leach strives to manifest industry success, retire in his thirties, and slow his pace. Leach also runs his own charitable organization, Overwatch, which aims to reduce oceanic plastic pollution through various fundraising missions. Consistently asked to speak upon the proverbial secret to his success, Leach also recently published his first memoir, aptly titled “The Formula for Success: How to Win at Life Using Your Own Personal Algorithm”, avidly outlining his strategies for success.

How did you get started in this business?

As a Marketing and Advertising student at the University of Hertfordshire, I began to consider the potential financial outcomes of various career trajectories, settling on the relative safety, excitement, and vastly unwavering potential of the global stock market. With a humble road through childhood, I recognized the transformative power of gaining successful access in the right industry, and set my sights on learning everything about the global stock market industry. Without real money to make any trades, I began to practice trading via faux paper investments, and realized my prowess for successfully managing my investments.

After earning top marks, I received a £2,000 stipend from the University, which I immediately used to enter the stock markets. Prior to graduation, after a series of successful trades, I turned that initial investment into a net worth of £178,000. When other students found out about my successes, they offered me money to teach them my methodology, and provide them with the knowledge needed to enter the markets with confidence. I loved teaching them, and spreading my belief in the unbridled financial possibilities associated with stocks. From there, I created Samuel & Co. Trading in 2012, and never looked back!

How do you make money?

Though I focus a great amount of my energy on actively teaching fledgling traders through the many programs within Samuel & Co. Trading, I trade personally roughly three to four days per week and maintain motivation in expanding my personal portfolio. Obviously, I generate wealth from my ongoing trading. Simultaneously, I also make money from the paid learning programs offered by my company, and from the profit-sharing programs available to the certified CPD traders upon completion of my bespoke training programs.

How long did it take for you to become profitable?

Fortunately, I worked to establish my trading prowess prior to investing my initial liquidity into the markets. Thus, as a trader, I was profitable from my initial investment, and remained profitable throughout my fledgling days as a trader. In my most memorable trading experience, I leveraged an initial £10,000 investment in an Apple TV competitor for Android into a valued £110,000. In my extensive research, I found that this company heavily invested in equipment, and was on the brink of providing a breakthrough service, dependent upon passing certain safety checks. Recognizing the potential rise in value, I researched the outcomes of similar products that underwent these checks and decided to take an educated risk that ended up being the catalyst for spearheading huge growth within my initial portfolio.

When I launched Samuel & Co. Trading, the entire venture was self-funded, and thus, retained the liquidity needed to initially invest in becoming profitable. Though it was a greater risk to be completely self-funded, this allowed me the opportunity to retain control of all operations, and build the company in a manner that I knew would be successful from the beginning. Steadily growing since inception, the company has welcomed great success.

When you were starting out, was there ever a time you doubted it would work? If so, how did you handle that?

Like every other entrepreneur, I did face moments of uncertainty. Instead of allowing hesitation to defeat my drive, I tried to remove the emotional component of entrepreneurship and to focus solely on pragmatic thought processes. By remaining emotionally collected, I was able to make the focused decisions that allowed my business to succeed.

How did you get your first customer?

During my University days, as a fledgling trader, my first informal customers were merely peers who were interested in pursuing similar ventures and recognized my initial successes as an indication that I could provide some insights into their budding forays into stock markets.

What is one marketing strategy (other than referrals) that you’re using that works really well to generate new business?

Honestly, word of mouth, along with maintaining a positive overall reputation, are both classic ways of garnering new business, and will always remain at the top of any industry that requires human connection, education, and interaction with others. However, I believe in the power of harnessing confidence in individuals and championing client success. By believing in clients, and showcasing that prospective clients have the capacity to really succeed in the markets, our company not only provides uncertain future traders with the tools for success, but allows them to take the plunge into a field of interest. Stock markets have traditionally been seen as complex beasts by many people, who have often shied away from even peeking around the proverbial corner. Thus, by removing some of that mystique, Samuel & Co. Trading has made stock market trading accessible, easy to understand, and inclusive to all.

What is the toughest decision you’ve had to make in the last few months?

Out of a desire to grow our Madrid-based operations, and champion local traders to bolster the economy and employment rates, I made the decision to invest in the infrastructure needed to appropriately support this growth. While this decision wasn’t tough ethically or emotionally, investing in growth always requires careful planning, thoughtful consideration, and overall commitment.

What do you think it is that makes you successful?

Though it is difficult to pinpoint to a specific characteristic or habit, I do tend to value my understanding of the need for hard work to incite success. While many entrepreneurs are surprised to find that large-scale successes don’t manifest overnight, this concept is something that I am not only familiar with, but thrive within. Thus, I have never been afraid to put in 100 hour work weeks, to check on my investments at 5:00 AM, or to dedicate my efforts wholeheartedly to my professional journey.

What has been your most satisfying moment in business?

Though monetary milestones have been amazing, the most inspiring and satisfying moments have come from building an amazing team of talented players. With the right team in place, anything is possible.

What does the future hold for your business? What are you most excited about?

In the immediate future, I hope to expand our reach even more, providing global learning opportunities to eager traders in underrepresented areas of the world.

What business books have inspired you?

Dr. Abraham Twerski has written many self-help and business-related books that I have always found to be fascinating. He often utilized the Lobster Principle within the scope of business. Without external pressure, lobsters do not grow. Similarly, in order to grow in business, external pressure must exist to propel entrepreneurs forward, and thus, is an essential part of the process.

What advice would you give to your younger self?

Though I value hard work and commitment, I would tell my younger self to reserve focus for the ventures that showcase long-term promise, rather than short-term advancements, such as part-time jobs maintained only to acquire additional spending money.

Are you willing to be a mentor? If so, how should someone contact you?

I would urge any young entrepreneur to start small, and to focus on securing successful experience with minimized risk. Additionally, I would encourage all entrepreneurs to be prepared to work hard, dedicate themselves to their dreams, and to relish in the hard work that is needed to successfully amass success.

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