Irfan Siddiqui knew at a young age that he wanted to grow up and work his way to become a doctor. His dedication to helping people began long before he began training to be a physician. By the time he started his educational journey toward his goal, he knew that he would best be able to assist others as a doctor.

Irfan attended Nova Southeastern University’s College of Osteopathic Medicine in 1995. He graduated with multiple degrees in the Biological Sciences, including his doctorate in 2003. From there, Irfan Siddiqui moved on to the Michigan State University Hospital managed by the Mclaren Health System. In three short years, he moved from resident to Chief Resident of Internal Medicine.

The next step in Dr. Irfan Siddiqui’s medical education journey was obtaining a fellowship in his chosen specialization. He began a fellowship in Cardiology in 2006. This led him to seek out the knowledge to become a surgeon in the specialty.

The last step in Irfan Siddiqui’s pursuit of education brought him to an Interventional Cardiology Fellowship for the VA at Intermountain Health Care program. This post-doctoral training was obtained in partnership with the University of Utah. The travel gave him a perspective he couldn’t have gotten in Florida. He brought all his lessons home to Florida where he now works at the Heart and Vascular Center in Davenport, Florida, in the United States of America.

Why did you choose to become a doctor?

When I was a child, I knew everything I wanted to do in life led me to help others. Watching someone around my age dealing with illnesses led me to seek out solutions for them. Obviously, as a child, there wasn’t anything that I could have done. However, it did inspire me to become a doctor one day.

I didn’t know I wanted to be a cardiologist though until I was already in my residency. During that time, I encountered several different specialties. The most fascinating and enlightening one, at least for me, was cardiology. This led me to move into my fellowship for Interventional Cardiology.

What area do you specialize in?

I am an Interventional Cardiologist. That means that when something happens, I am the doctor that a primary care physician, PCP, would send their patients to. I usually order stress tests and an assortment of required tests after speaking to the patient at length. This helps me determine what will help the patient and ensure they are getting the problem resolved in the best way possible.

During follow up visits, once we have addressed whatever brought them to me in the first place, I work to determine what lifestyle changes would help them sustain the positive results we have achieved.

Why did you choose this specialty?

I picked this specialization because it seems to be the best way for me to have a positive, lasting impact in the lives I come across. It is a pleasure to be able to produce positive outcomes that save lives and improve them over time. There is nothing else like it anywhere.

What is your daily routine?

Each morning I review what patients are on my schedule. I make the time to get acquainted with their information and chart before the appointments begin. Once I have that sorted out, I begin seeing patients. By the afternoon I do rounds, return phone calls, and follow up where I need to. Everyday is a little different of course. It’s not as though the agenda stays rigid and predictable like that everyday. There is a lot of crisis management that needs to be done and I can only hope to deal with it the best way I can.

When you look forward in your career, what trend in medicine do you see impacting your specialty the most? Is it for the better or worse? Why?

There are an untold number of medical breakthroughs that is going to have a lasting impact on every single aspect of medicine. One of my favorites is the improvements in heart replacement devices. There are many upcoming devices that will minimize the need for external wires.

I’m also looking forward to the improvement of in-home assessments and reporting methods. The in-home devices allow us to be able to monitor them at home, without limitation, and obtaining the information remotely.

What do you love about your job?

I love being able to positively impact the lives of the people who I encounter. Some of them have been changed for the better in the long-term. Taking someone from the brink of a heart attack to the proper lifestyle changes that improve their overall life and move them away from that brink is incredible. You know you’ve helped them. You know you’ve been able to extend their life and the quality thereof.

What would you consider to be the greatest accomplishment in your career?

You know, I’m not sure I can really answer that question. I believe that every success, positive change, and life saved is my greatest accomplishment. There isn’t just one thing. There are just the positive results in the lives of my patents.

Tell our readers about some of your volunteer activities.

I volunteer where I can. There are always opportunities and ways that I can help. Sometimes it is forgiving a debt, or spending time in the soup kitchen. While I spend most of my time at the hospital dealing and alleviating pain for my patients, I do enjoy giving back to the community and helping out in other ways.

What do you do in order to mentally separate yourself from your job?

I make sure to spend time exercising regularly. Keeping healthy habits is something important to me so spending time doing that helps me stay busy, healthy, and separate myself from a day with my patients. While it doesn’t always work, it does typically improve my mood after a long day and enable me to manage whatever might linger.

Where do you want to be in your career in five years?

Honestly, I just want to be doing what I am doing now. I have the joy of helping others improve their lives and many times save them from poor choices and habits. I really couldn’t imagine doing anything else in my career.

 

For more information, please visitirfan-siddiqui.com/

 

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